skip navigation

It’s no secret that the cold season can cause undue stress. Financial burdens, academic pressure, and weather or illness-related social isolation can lead to challenges in caring for your mental health. 

Please take care of yourself and others during this time; your kindness– to yourself and your peers– makes the difference. 

We’ve created a list of five self-care and outreach tips if you need help figuring out how to start.

But, before we offer recommendations, please call 911 or contact any of the following numbers if you need immediate aid:

  • Suicide Prevention Hotline: 988
  • Utah Crisis Number: 801-587-3000
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-273-8255
  • SafeUT Text Number: 741-741

And if you are a student and need help managing your mental health, consult with a school counselor, school nurse, mental health provider, or another health care professional. They’ll connect you with the aid you need.

  1. Download the SafeUT app. The app and the text line allow you to speak to a professional anonymously. SafeUT professionals can also advise families or friends on how to interact with individuals going through mental health crises.
  2. If you’re a parent concerned for your child but aren’t sure where to start, read the Mental Health government website’s article, “For Parents and Caregivers.” The article covers signs that your child might be struggling. They then identify the next steps you can take involving mental health professionals and how to speak to your child about mental health.
  3. If you or a loved one needs aid with housing, utilities, employment, food, clothing, transportation, medical, dental, vision, internet, help with domestic violence or abuse, or uninsured / Medicaid-covered mental health partners, start by visiting our Community Source webpage. We link sites to community partners for every need.
  4. BYU’s Comprehensive Clinic hosts virtual counseling for 15 dollars. Please call 801-422-7759 to schedule an intake or make an appointment online for quick and affordable counseling.
  5. Implement as many of the National Institute of Mental Health’s research-based suggestions as you are ready to use.
    1. Get regular exercise. Just 30 minutes of walking every day can help boost your mood and improve your health.
    2. Eat healthy, regular meals, and stay hydrated. A balanced diet and plenty of water can improve your energy and focus throughout the day.
    3. Make sleep a priority. Stick to a schedule, and make sure you’re getting enough sleep. Reduce blue light exposure from your phone or computer before bedtime.
    4. Try a relaxing activity. Explore relaxation or wellness programs or apps, which may incorporate meditation, muscle relaxation, or breathing exercises. Schedule regular healthy activities you enjoy, such as journaling.
    5. Set goals and priorities. Decide what must get done now and what can wait. Learn to say “no” to new tasks if you feel you’re taking on too much. Try to be mindful of what you have accomplished at the end of the day, not what you have been unable to do.
    6. Practice gratitude. Remind yourself daily of the things you are grateful for. Be specific. Write them down at night, or replay them in your mind.
    7. Focus on positivity. Identify and challenge your negative and unhelpful thoughts.
    8. Stay connected. Reach out to your friends or family members who can provide emotional support and practical help.

Small, daily acts matter. Don’t feel discouraged if it takes time to improve your mental health. Simply start today, and celebrate the steps that you take.

Again, please call 911 or contact any of the following numbers if you need immediate aid:

  • Suicide Prevention Hotline: 988
  • Utah Crisis Number: 801-587-3000
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-273-8255
  • SafeUT Text Number: 741-741
Spencer Tuinei
  • Communication Specialist
  • Spencer Tuinei
0 Shares
en_USEnglish